On Tuesday June 4th on or about 4pm, air controllers at JKIA/Wilson lost contact with a Cessna Caravan plane flying from Kitale to Nairobi. Aboard the FLYSAX plane were 10 passengers, including crew members.

Two days later, Kenyans had to accept the sad reality after new broke that the plane had crashed in the Aberdare Forest. No one survived.

One of the passengers aboard the ill-fated flight was Dr. Kabaka Waweru who hailed from Baricho. The village mourns the loss of an astute and great man, a man of honor. Dr. Kabaka was a decent human being who listened more and talked less. He let his actions do the talking.

See as a child, I witnessed the greatness of Dr. Kabaka. I saw with my own eyes why he was loved by everybody. Back then, he was working for the ministry of Health. We called him our Veterinarian. And this is what Dr. Kabaka, I believe, cherished the most-animals.

Back in the 90’s, there was one bull that ruled entire Baricho. This bull was also famed East of Baricho in Kianjege, to the West in Kiajang’a and Ndigaru, to the South in Kamurugo, Tokyo and Kiandangae and to the North in areas like Kariria and Gituamba. It was the bulls’ bull, revered for its “healthy seed.” This bull was named Amigo.

So famous was Amigo that locals believed (and still believe) Les Wanyika’s song “Amigo” was composed in its honor. According to this school of thought, as John Ngereza and Les Wanyika visited Sagana seeking Afro (mtoto wa Sagana), someone tipped the group about the Amigo wonders. The rest, as they say, is history.

The day Amigo was taken ill, there was concern among the people that the end for Amigo was nigh. Maybe he had grown weary after years of you know what. Still, could be that a cow had infected him with ndigana……..People were distraught. “Ng’ombe citu ciribaicagwa nuu…” some women were heard whispering to each other. I tell you what, there were tears for Amigo. He needed the best attention. No one else could the village think of, other than Dr. Kabaka.

Many telegrams were dispatched to Dr. Kabaka summoning him to come attend to the Kingsian fierce urgency of the moment. See, Dr. Kabaka was always there for his people and their needs. And on this time it was no different. It wasn’t strange therefore to see him drive into Ezekiel Mutugi’s homestead armed with all the necessary tools for the task at hand. His mere presence was so calming that you could have cut the relief in the air with a knife.

Dr. Kabaka spent a few minutes attending to Amigo. You could tell the animal knew who he was. The sight was magical. After doing what he knew was best for the bull, Dr. Kabaka gave thumbs up to the villagers saying: “He will be fine.”

And just as he was about to depart, one naughty boy shouted: “Nie Kubota kubeana mbegu..” The little rascal was serious; but the villagers laughed at the insane comic relief. It was a thunderous laughter by men and women who had gathered to witness Amigo spring back to health, all courtesy of Dr. Kabaka.

This is the man we have lost. His compassion was ever stenciled in every little thing he set out to do. I believe the 9 other passengers were witnesses to this. We will never find out, but believe me, they did. He was a gem to our village. May his soul rest in eternal peace.

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African Warrior (AW) is a US-Based-Africa-Focused all round Magazine targeting African Diaspora in USA, Europe & Beyond. It aims to deliver informative, educative, and entertaining News & Information normally underplayed or altogether neglected by mainstream media; exploring potential to scale-up the presence and contribution of this highly dynamic African Community living in the West by highlighting their journeys, Challenges and Victories as they navigate new horizons in search of greener pastures. Write to us, info@awmagazine.org